Idunno what to call this.

This blog isn't about anything specific. I'm just another lazy guy who reblogs what I like. Follow me if you like what I like. Or not. It's your dashboard.
transhumanisticpanspermia:

thestonedsociety:

First guy to buy legal, non-medical marijuana in Colorado today

i don’t know what face i expected someone to make when they realize their photo will be immortalized for centuries as the first person to buy legal pot in an america approaching a post-war on drugs period of history, but this is exactly that face

transhumanisticpanspermia:

thestonedsociety:

First guy to buy legal, non-medical marijuana in Colorado today

i don’t know what face i expected someone to make when they realize their photo will be immortalized for centuries as the first person to buy legal pot in an america approaching a post-war on drugs period of history, but this is exactly that face

(via chillyeskimo)

I thought VVVVVV was just a platformer that lets you flip gravity, but apparently it ends each level by showing you all the secrets of the universe while wiring millions of dollars to your bank account.

I thought VVVVVV was just a platformer that lets you flip gravity, but apparently it ends each level by showing you all the secrets of the universe while wiring millions of dollars to your bank account.

curiosamathematica:

If Satan plays miniature golf, this is his favorite hole. A ball struck at A, in any direction, will never find the hole at B, even if it bounces forever.
The idea arose in the 1950s, when Ernst Straus wondered whether a room lined with mirrors would always be illuminated completely by a single match.
Straus’ question went unanswered until 1995, when George Tokarsky found a 26-sided room with a “dark” spot; two years later D. Castro offered the 24-sided improvement above. If a candle is placed at A, and you’re standing at B, you won’t see its reflection anywhere around you, even though you’re surrounded by mirrors.

curiosamathematica:

If Satan plays miniature golf, this is his favorite hole. A ball struck at A, in any direction, will never find the hole at B, even if it bounces forever.

The idea arose in the 1950s, when Ernst Straus wondered whether a room lined with mirrors would always be illuminated completely by a single match.

Straus’ question went unanswered until 1995, when George Tokarsky found a 26-sided room with a “dark” spot; two years later D. Castro offered the 24-sided improvement above. If a candle is placed at A, and you’re standing at B, you won’t see its reflection anywhere around you, even though you’re surrounded by mirrors.

(via thecraftychemist)